Advanced search

Message boards : Graphics cards (GPUs) : Upgrade to a Titan Z?

Author Message
Profile caffeineyellow5
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 30 Jul 14
Posts: 225
Credit: 2,658,976,345
RAC: 0
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39756 - Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 17:08:30 UTC

I have a rig with 3 GTX780's in it and it has been working very nicely now that it has the new drivers and BOINC version. Now I see here http://www.gpugrid.net/forum_thread.php?id=1150 that up until a certain point the GPUs are listed in terms of GFLOPS peaks, but then after that point they start getting listed in terms of % in performance and performance/Watt using the GTX Titan as a 100% standard. I wonder if this could be updated to a standard system using GFLOPS peaks?

Past that, I see that the Titan Z is a triple slot device while the 3 I have are double slot items. I am pretty sure I could replace the bottom 780 with the Titan Z as far as room goes. Unfortunately I may not be able to do this because the hot swap slots for 2 of the 4 hard drives I have installed will be right up against that bottom device. That would become a heat issue either on the card or on the drives or both.

So my question (other than if the thread about the GPU Card comparisons being standardized) is if I had to remove two of the 780s, would the performance of the project actually see an increase over 3 780s? Does the Titan Z use both GPUs to run the project being seen as 2 GPUs or is it seen as one GPU either doing the units twice as fast or not using one half of the card? I know that the heat issue produced by 3 cards would be reduced because the Titan Z in the top slot and then the remaining 780 in the bottom slot would leave a single slot width in between them while currently they are up against each other with only a small slit between them.

If I can't find a PC to put the other cards in, I am thinking about donating them to the project to the Barcelona office or maybe building a device with a weak CPU that can do the project on the GPUs. Thank you for your feedback on this.
____________
1 Corinthians 9:16 "For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel!"
Ephesians 6:18-20, please ;-)
http://tbc-pa.org

Profile MJH
Project administrator
Project developer
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 12 Nov 07
Posts: 696
Credit: 27,266,655
RAC: 0
Level
Val
Scientific publications
watwat
Message 39757 - Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 17:10:46 UTC - in response to Message 39756.

In the context of GPUGRID, the Titan Z's bad value for money. If you really want to upgrade, the GTX9x0s are the best to get - someone will be along in a moment to tell you which offers the best bang/buck.

Matt

Profile caffeineyellow5
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 30 Jul 14
Posts: 225
Credit: 2,658,976,345
RAC: 0
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39763 - Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 17:32:41 UTC - in response to Message 39757.

Oh, also, since the Titan Zs are a few months old, which is a long time in technological speed these days, is there a better card in the pipeline that I should consider holding off for?

Profile caffeineyellow5
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 30 Jul 14
Posts: 225
Credit: 2,658,976,345
RAC: 0
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39765 - Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 17:35:32 UTC - in response to Message 39757.
Last modified: 27 Jan 2015 | 17:36:19 UTC

In the context of GPUGRID, the Titan Z's bad value for money. If you really want to upgrade, the GTX9x0s are the best to get - someone will be along in a moment to tell you which offers the best bang/buck.

Thank you for this. As far as money goes, it is not an issue. The bang is the important part of the question, not the buck. If the Z is a better option than a 9x0 when it comes to performance with my configuration, then the money to achieve it is not part of the consideration.

ExtraTerrestrial Apes
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 17 Aug 08
Posts: 2688
Credit: 1,172,992,599
RAC: 133,954
Level
Met
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39778 - Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 21:43:52 UTC

Caffeineyellow5, the money may not be a limiting factor for you, but bang for the buck and efficiency should IMO still be considered. Any money saved for similar performance can be put towards other good uses.

Given the better energy efficiency of Maxwell, buying anything older for 24/7 crunching is a waste these days. Titan Z still uses the same Kepler GPUs as your current GTX780's.

You could replace them with GTX970 for excellent band for the buck and efficiency. The performance is comparable and you save energy.. although GTX780 is relatively efficient itself, so the savings aren't huge.

You could replace them with GTX980, which provides about the same performance as a GTX780Ti for still excellent energy efficiency. It's significantly more expensive, though, hence I never recommend it. And in your case the performance increase wouldn't be that large to (IMO) justify an upgrade.

However, "big Maxwell" is rumored to be released at some point in the 1st half of 2015, maybe around march. It's expected to be practically 50% bigger than GTX980 in every aspect, which is significantly more powerful. We do not yet know in which configurations it's going to be available. I suspect it's going to be the next Titan and professional GPUs first, which will make it an even worse value proposition than GTX980.

If you want higher throughput and like fiddling around I'd vote for building a small GPU cruncher with 2 GPUs. Get 2 GTX970 and shuffle GPUs as you see fit. The small guy can have a small current Intel CPU with 2 cores and 16 PCIe 3 lanes. If it's dedicated to feeding the GPUs it will suffice. You could also run Linux on that host for additional performance, if you're brave enough to fiddle around with that software.

MrS
____________
Scanning for our furry friends since Jan 2002

Profile caffeineyellow5
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 30 Jul 14
Posts: 225
Credit: 2,658,976,345
RAC: 0
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39786 - Posted: 28 Jan 2015 | 2:45:51 UTC - in response to Message 39778.

Thanks for the input. That is exactly what I needed. I think if that other thread laid it out with one standard in the first post people like me just learning would have a better guide to go on. I just don't know what I am looking at. Even a "How To" guide to learning about graphics cards and how they compare and what the different parts of them mean, like shaders and core and memory speeds and all that mean and how they relate to the project would be great for beginners.
____________
1 Corinthians 9:16 "For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel!"
Ephesians 6:18-20, please ;-)
http://tbc-pa.org

Profile Retvari Zoltan
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 20 Jan 09
Posts: 2058
Credit: 15,020,954,169
RAC: 3,795,723
Level
Trp
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39830 - Posted: 29 Jan 2015 | 11:40:20 UTC

Dual GPU-ed graphic cards like the GTX 295, GTX 590, GTX 690, GTX Titan Z have the cooler fan between the two GPU chips, in the middle of the card. Therefore the card emits its heat evenly in its both ends, so the half of that heat remains inside the computer's case, which could result in overheating, if the case fans aren't arranged accordingly (there should be fans in the front of the case which blows the hot air out, and fans on the side panel blowing cool air in). So the adequate case fan arrangement is different for dual GPU-ed graphic cards and for single GPU-ed graphic cards. Mixing them in a single host needs a little experimentation to find the right airflow direction for the best cooling.
I'm sure that at some point there will be a dual GPU-ed version of the GTX980, and that will much better bang for the buck than a Titan Z. If there will be a GTX version of Big Maxwell GPU (like the GTX 780 Ti of the Big Kepler GPU), it will be the best buy for GPUGrid.
Dual GPU-ed cards process two workunits at the same time, so a single but faster GPU-ed card is always the better choice.

Profile caffeineyellow5
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 30 Jul 14
Posts: 225
Credit: 2,658,976,345
RAC: 0
Level
Phe
Scientific publications
watwatwatwatwatwatwatwat
Message 39892 - Posted: 30 Jan 2015 | 8:12:09 UTC - in response to Message 39830.

Thanks Zoltan for answering some of the specifics.

Yes, I don't have the correct fan config for a dual GPU. The fans blow in the front and out the back. There are no fans on the side, which may be my solution to the top of 3 fans getting too hot even now. Currently I have the window open (below freezing outside right now) and a room fan blowing at the front of it, to add the air moving through it around the fans as well as by the fans. It's a good thing I have the CPU water cooled so that it doesn't add too much more to the heat inside the box.

Instead of getting a higher card for just a small amount of extra processing, I decided to put that money directly into the project via a donation of the price of the card. I will probably get a fan installed into the side of that rig and then upgrade to 980s while putting together a new cheaper rig for the 780s.
____________
1 Corinthians 9:16 "For though I preach the gospel, I have nothing to glory of: for necessity is laid upon me; yea, woe is unto me, if I preach not the gospel!"
Ephesians 6:18-20, please ;-)
http://tbc-pa.org

Post to thread

Message boards : Graphics cards (GPUs) : Upgrade to a Titan Z?